Bunions Affect Young People too

Bunions Affect Young People too

Being young doesn’t mean you are invincible and not taking care of your feet will give you a fast-pass to the Podiatrist’s office. According to an article in wsj.com, a young lady from Massachusetts had to seek surgical treatment for bunions at just 26-years-old. She was involved in a number of athletic activities and, despite mostly wearing sensible shoes, she rapidly reached a point where the pain from her bunions was unbearable.

Bunion is the common term for hallux abducto-valgus which refers to the protrusion of the joint at the base of the big toe toward the mid-line of the body, with or without pain and swelling. A bunionette is similar but is smaller and occurs on the outer side of the foot at the base of the little toe. Both conditions may be hereditary or may be caused by arthritis or a structural imbalance in the feet.

Research indicates that bunions are more prevalent in women and the elderly and more than one third of American women have bunions. Regardless of the underlying cause, women are more likely to increase the severity of the condition by wearing unsuitable narrow or high-heeled footwear that cramps the toes. A secondary complication, usually caused by too-tight footwear, is bursitis. This appears as a swollen area over the joint that may fill with fluid and become hot and inflamed.

In the short-term, you can take anti-inflammatory medication and apply ice to relieve your discomfort. Removing your shoes and resting your feet will help and you may find wearing shoes that have a low heel and a broad, deep toe box reduces your pain. However, if you reach a point where this conservative approach is not providing relief, seek help from a specialist like Toronto-based podiatrist, Sheldon H. Nadal, D.P.M. He will determine if your condition can be improved with prescription orthotics (custom-made shoe inserts) or if you would benefit from surgery.

Sheldon Nadal performs minimally invasive surgery, which reduces the pain and discomfort experienced with more traditional techniques and speeds up recovery time.


Resources:

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2955707/

http://www.livestrong.com/article/293105-bunions-bunionettes/

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/152120.php

http://www.wsj.com/articles/SB10001424127887323783704578250103556497448