Nailing a Cancer Diagnosis

"One in three Atlantic Canadians are diagnosed with cancer, compared with one in four people from British Columbia," according to David Thompson, director of operations, for the Atlantic Partnership for Tomorrow's Health (Atlantic PATH) , who was quoted in an article on metronews.ca This finding led to an unusual cancer study that initially involved the collection of a record number...24,999 to be precise...sets of toenails!

The toenail clippings will be used in a study that takes into account a number of other lifestyle factors to find out why there is such a dramatic difference in cancer rates between the two regions. But why toenails? Because they contain scientific evidence of the body's absorption of heavy metals like arsenic. Heavy metals, which are found in well water, are known factors in bladder and kidney cancer.

So, even if you think your toenails are pretty insignificant, perhaps one day your nails could be worthy of a place in the Guiness Book of World Records. Meanwhile, you might want to consider how well you look after your toenails. Without proper care and attention, you could find yourself suffering from toenail fungus, ingrown toenails, cracked or split nails, or maybe a subungual haematoma (ulceration of the tissue underneath a nail).

Proper care and attention includes keeping your feet clean, washing and drying thoroughly between your toes, cutting your toenails straight across, wearing correctly fitted shoes and maintaining a healthy, balanced diet. If you notice any changes in the colour or health of your nails or you are experiencing pain on either side of a nail, a visit to your local Toronto, Ontario Podiatrist Sheldon Nadal D.P.M. should help resolve any nail issues you may have. You should also take extra care of your feet and nails if you are a diabetic or have poor circulation.

References:

Nailed it: Atlantic Canada cancer study sets world record with toenail collection - By Haley Ryan

http://metronews.ca/news/halifax/916707/nailed-it-atlantic-canada-cancer-study-sets-world-record-with-toenail-collection/