Toronto podiatrist thinks NBA basketball player Stephen Curry may have plantar fasciitis

According to articles on the internet, Stephen Curry of the Golden State Warriors injured his foot in the first quarter in a game on Wednesday Feruaray 22 2012.

Apparently, X-Rays were negative so he returned in the second quarter but continued to limp. Doctors were not sure if he had injured the posterior tibial tendon ( a tendon that aids in supination and supports the arch) or if he had injured the plantar fascia (a broad ligament that runs from the heel to the toes at the bottom - plantar - surface of the foot and also supports the arch.

Symptoms of plantar fasciitis includes pain at the heel or arch with the first few steps when getting out of bed in the morning and after sitting. It often feels better with stretching and a short amount of walking. The pain tends to increase with increased standing and walking and can feel worse toward the end of the day. It may not feel bad during exercise but usually feel worse the morning after exercising.

I have been treating heel and arch pain due to plantar fasciitis in my Toronto podiatry office for more than thirty years. If you think you have plantar fasciitis, you may be able to get relief by taking anti-inflammatory medicine such as Aspirin, A.S.A, Ibuprofen, or Naprosyn, provided you do not have hypertension (high blood pressure) or a history of gastric (stomach) ulcers - if you are not sure, you should talk to your family doctor. It may also be time to replace your sport shoes or buy off the shelf insoles at your drug store to give your foot added support.

If you continue to have pain, you should see your podiatrist (foot specialist). He may recommend made to measure custom foot orthotics to wear in your shoes to improve the biomechanics of your feet and relieve excessive strain.

It is also important to relieve the inflammation. Your podiatrist can do this with prescription strength anti-inflammatory medicine or cortisone injections. However these can have unwanted side effects so in my Toronto foot clinic I offer the latest in sound wave and laser therapy.

If your heel pain or plantar fasciitis is acute (of fairly recent onset) I use a combination of superpulsed laser and a soundwave modality called radial wave, pressure wave or radial shockwave. You can walk immediately, anesthetic is not required and there is very little discomfort with the procedure. Most people will come in weekly for a total of three to five treatments.

For someone who has chronic plantar fasciitis, (someone who has been suffering for several months) and has not responded to other treatments, I use Extracorporeal Shock Wave Therapy or ESWT with local anesthetic. Most people require only one treatment. I find that in the vast majority of cases, extracorporeal shockwave can eliminate the need for surgery.

If you think you have plantar fasciitis or any other type of foot problem, including bunions, hammertoes, corns, calluses, ingrown nails or fungal nails, please call my Toronto podiatry office at 416-486-9917 for a personal consultation to find out how my staff and I can help end your foot pain.