Athlete’s Foot: Kicking It for Good

Athlete’s foot, medically known as tinea pedis, is caused by a fungus. Contrary to its name, even non-athletes can develop this foot problem. Fungi thrive in warm, moist and dark areas – locker rooms, public swimming pools, shared public showers, etc. Anyone at any given age can have this. Its symptoms are cracked and scaling heels, red and itchy spaces between the toes, and sometimes it also causes blisters.

 

Most athlete’s foot infections can be treated and eradicated easily. The challenge comes in preventing a re-infection from occurring once you have gotten rid of it.

 

Here are some ways on how to kick athlete’s foot for good:

 

Avoid sweats.

Fungus loves heat and moisture, so you should keep your feet dry as possible. If you are an athlete or if you work out regularly, it can be challenging. Apply antifungal powder on your feet prior to wearing socks – this helps in keeping feet dry. Carry an extra pair of socks if you know you are going to break a sweat. It is also advisable to change your socks at least once a day.

Avoid walking barefoot.

If you are going to be in a public place, carry a pair of slippers with you – to the locker room, pool, hotel showers, gym, etc. Even in your own home, avoid walking barefoot whether or not you have developed athlete’s foot.

Dry with air.

While you are still in the process of treating athlete’s foot, it helps if you let your feet out as much as possible but do so without walking barefoot. You may wear open-toed shoes or sandals while your feet are still recovering. This would be challenging during winter.

 

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Bleach your shower as well as your socks.

This is a great way to prevent re-infection of athlete’s foot. Once a week, make it a habit to bleach your socks and the bottom of the tub or shower. You would want to prevent fungus from living underneath all the grime.

 

Use fungal creams.

Over-the-counter fungal creams that are applied to the bottom of the feet as well as in between the toes kill off the fungus on your feet. The duration of this treatment is depending on the severity of athlete’s foot. It is best to consult a podiatrist before buying fungal creams.

 

Let Sheldon H. Nadal, D.P.M. help you deal with this troublesome infection.