Summer Heat can mean Troublesome Feet

Summer Heat can mean Troublesome Feet

Flip-flop and sandal season is here again, so it’s worth reviewing some of the consequences of being a slave to foot fashion…or not.

High temperatures mean increased body heat and perspiration which can mean trouble for feet. With closed-in footwear, your skin can’t breathe and the warm conditions activate fungal spores which can lead to athlete’s foot (a fungal infection of the skin). This can make the skin itchy and fissures (splits) may appear in the skin, especially between the toes. Your skin may be red and itchy or white and moist. Blisters may erupt on affected skin and the infection can spread across the feet and into your nails. Secondary bacterial infections are common because socks and shoes are not sterile so any resident bacteria can invade where the skin is broken.

High temperatures cause feet to swell so closed-in shoes feel tight, increasing the pressure on your toes. The combination of heat and pressure can lead to maceration of the skin between the toes which can result in the formation of a soft corn. The skin between the toes appears white and rubbery and you may experience pain between the contiguous toe joints.

The answer to this sizzling dilemma seems simple: cast off your shoes and wear sandals or flip-flops. Unfortunately, this is not so; fashionable footwear can also be troublesome. According to a study by a British motor insurance company, flip-flops are the most hazardous shoes you can wear while driving. Not only that, but flip-flops and many sandals do not support your feet meaning your feet have to work overtime to maintain your balance. This extra work is tiring and can trigger a number of other posture-related aches and pains.

Flip-flops are fine for the beach or around the pool, but shouldn’t be worn for extended periods. Sandals should also be treated as an occasional fashion accessory. Schedule a visit with your Toronto Podiatrist, Sheldon H. Nadal, to assess your footwear and treatment options for those heat-induced foot problems. Otherwise, you may just have to chill in the shade.

 

Resources:

http://www.opma.ca/FHAM

http://www.health.harvard.edu/staying-healthy/athletes-foot-causes-prevention-and-treatment

http://www.scpod.org/foot-health/common-foot-problems/corns/

http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/is-being-trendy-bad-for-your-health-552870