You Can’t Stop the Effects of Nature

In a perfect world we would all have perfect feet with skin as soft as a baby’s, but that would probably mean not walking. The reason babies have beautiful soft skin and straight toes is because nature and life have not had time to take their toll.

As soon as our feet are planted on the ground, the pressure is on…quite literally. Direct pressure is applied to the fat pads and any twisting or sliding of the feet creates friction and torsion which causes shear stress across the multiple layers of skin. With time, the skin on the soles of the feet starts to toughen up…and this is a good thing for prevention of cuts and sores when barefoot. However, normal life necessitates the use of footwear and shoes add additional pressure to the sides and top of the feet. This pressure squeezes the bones and joints, especially if the shoes are not a good fit.

Distortion of the foot structure affects foot function and additional pressure is placed on prominent joints. This extra pressure may cause callus, a thickened patch of skin that is hard and rough. The skin may be white or yellowed and can lack sensation. In small amounts, callus is harmless and can actually protect the feet from further trauma. When it builds up to a thick plaque, it can be painful.

Pressure or torsion across joints or an area of callus can result in the formation of a corn which is a hard, cone-shaped lesion. Hard corns are painful under direct pressure so footwear can cause more pain until the lesion is removed.

Home remedies are available over the counter but must be used with caution. Pumice or foot files can be used to pare away callus, but steer clear of sharp blades. Similarly, ointments that claim to cure corns contain acids which can burn healthy skin if not used carefully.

Ideally, the best way to treat corns or callus is to seek help from a foot care professional like Sheldon H. Nadal, D.P.M. who can skillfully remove them. He can pinpoint the cause and provide a comprehensive treatment plan.

 

Resources:

http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/172459.php

http://newsnetwork.mayoclinic.org/discussion/home-treatment-options-for-corns-and-calluses/